1774 – A Retrospective

18 January 2024 – Wigmore Hall

The Mozartists’ pioneering MOZART 250 project continues with this fascinating exploration of the musical scene across Europe in 1774. The wide-ranging programme, including several works receiving their UK première, begins with a richly dynamic ‘Sturm und Drang’ symphony by Anton Zimmermann, and ends with an extended scene from Gluck’s Paris version of his celebrated setting of the Orpheus legend.

Zimmermann Symphony in E minor
Gluck “Par un père cruel” from Iphigénie en Aulide
Gluck “Jupiter, lance la foudre” from Iphigénie en Aulide
Anfossi “Care pupile belle” from La finta giardiniera (UK première)
Salieri “Sperar il caro porto” from La calamita de’ cuori (UK première)
Mozart “Ergo interest… Quaere superna” K. 143
Mysliveček “Pace e calma in questo segno” from Artaserse (UK première)
Mozart Symphony No. 29 in A, K. 201
Gluck Scene from Act 3 of Orphée et Euridice
Tickets £18.00 — £50 (plus venue booking fees).

Wigmore Hall
36 Wigmore Street
London
W1u 2BP

https://www.wigmore-hall.org.uk/

020 7935 2141

 

Programme
Zimmermann Symphony in E minor
Gluck “Par un père cruel” from Iphigénie en Aulide
Gluck “Jupiter, lance la foudre” from Iphigénie en Aulide
Anfossi “Care pupile belle” from La finta giardiniera (UK première)
Salieri “Sperar il caro porto” from La calamita de’ cuori (UK première)
Mozart “Ergo interest… Quaere superna” K. 143
Mysliveček “Pace e calma in questo segno” from Artaserse (UK première)
Mozart Symphony No. 29 in A, K. 201
Gluck Scene from Act 3 of Orphée et Euridice
Artists
Practical Information
Tickets £18.00 — £50 (plus venue booking fees).

Wigmore Hall
36 Wigmore Street
London
W1u 2BP

https://www.wigmore-hall.org.uk/

020 7935 2141

 

With special thanks to the Garrick Charitable Trust and Cockayne – Grants for the Arts, & the many other generous trusts and individuals who support our work.

“This is exactly the kind of mad thing that makes MOZART 250 so diverting: unearthing forgotten works… playing them often for the first time since the 18th century, and giving us a real feeling of the musical air Mozart was breathing.”

ROBERT THICKNESSE, OPERA NOW MAGAZINE